Thursday, January 27, 2005

Missouri - Watts

Watts Family

*Missouri


I recall a case in point. Some time during the fall of 1857, in company with a man belonging to Dr. Watts, who lived near Brunswick, Missouri, as we were passing his master's farm, one Sunday night, we heard cattle in the corn field destroying green corn. These cattle had pushed down the fence. I said to the man: "Let us drive them out and put up the fence."

Page 40

His reply was, "It's Massa's corn and Massa's cattle, and I don't care how much they destroy; he won't thank me for driving them out, and I will not do it."
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In the fall of 1859 there was a dance given at Col. Ewing's farm, to which several young men and girls were invited and attended; most of them had passes except four girls, who had failed to secure them. The patrols came about twelve o'clock that night and surrounded the house, allowing those having passes to go free, and were preparing to whip the four girls who had none, right there in the presence of their beaux, who were powerless to protect them, when a young fellow, whose name was Lindsay Watts, came up and said, "Lor, masses, it am a great pity to whip dese sweet angels, 'deed 'tis; if you will let dem go, I will take the whippin' for dem all." His proposition was accepted, and the girls turned loose made rapid steps to their homes. The patrols took Lindsay outside of the yard, and stripped him naked, preparatory to giving him four times nine and thirty lashes, but being naked and hard to hold or grab, he escaped and ran home to his master in that condition, followed closely by the patrols. But his master protected him. The girls who barely escaped a lashing reached home safely and thankfully....

THE NEW MAN. TWENTY-NINE YEARS A SLAVE. TWENTY-NINE YEARS A FREE MAN.
RECOLLECTIONS OF H. C. BRUCE. YORK, PA. P. ANSTADT & SONS. 1895.

Watts Family

Descendants of Robert Dawson

Generation No. 1

1. ROBERT1 DAWSON He married (1) UNKNOWN Abt. 1840. He met (2) SALLIE DAWSON 1845. She was born

1824 in Missouri, and died 1898 in Cairo, Illinois.

More About ROBERT DAWSON:

Race: White

More About UNKNOWN:

Race: White

Notes for SALLIE DAWSON:

Extract from 1865 State Census Illinois. Cairo, Alexander Co., Colored Pct. , Sally Battice age 30-

40.[Allfam3.FTW]

1870 Census: January 1870, Cairo, Alexander Co., Illinois. S. Cairo Pct.

Race: Mulatto

Soundex: B132 B320

Child of ROBERT DAWSON and UNKNOWN is:

i. MARY AUGUSTINE2 DAWSON, b. Abt. 1844.

More About MARY AUGUSTINE DAWSON:

Race: White

Child of ROBERT DAWSON and SALLIE DAWSON is:

2. ii. MATILDA2 DAWSON, b. May 1845, Fayette, Missouri; d. March 27, 1930, Rockford, Winnebago, Illinois..

Generation No. 2

2. MATILDA2 DAWSON (ROBERT1) was born May 1845 in Fayette, Missouri, and died March 27, 1930 in

Rockford, Winnebago, Illinois.. She married (1) HENRY PATRICK Abt. 1860 in Cairo, Alexander, Illinois. He was born Abt. 1840 in Missouri, and died Abt. 1866 in Cairo, Alexander, Illinois.. She married (2) HENRY G. WILSON December 05, 1878 in Springfield, Illinois (Source: State of Illinois Sangamon County Clerk's Office, Vol # 005 Page # 0213.), son of UNKNOWN WILSON and SARAH GIBBS. He was born November 1855 in Mo, and died October 04, 1909 in Springfield, Illinois.

Notes for MATILDA DAWSON:

Extract from 1865 State Census Illinois. Cairo, Alexander Co., Colored Pct. , Female age 10-20. Occupation:

Domestic, 1900 Census, Maid, 1910 Census.

Interment No. 7763 Rockford, IL 3/31/1930

Name of deceased: Matilda Gibbs Wilson

Born: Fayette, Missouri 1841 Died: Rockford, IL 3/27/1930 Dr. Charles Leonard, attending physician

Undertaker: Burpee Disposition of remains: Earth burial

Names and Address of Nearest relatives:

Fannie Watts, Daughter 2005 11th St. Springfield, IL

Henry Watts, Grandson 330 Lincoln Ave, Rockford, IL

Robert Watts, Grandson 1930 Hartrey Ave. Evanston, IL

Belle Wilson, Granddaughter 3404 Calumet Ave. Chicago, IL

Edith Lindsey, Granddaughter 5938 S. Park Ave. Chicago, IL

Edna Sellars, Granddaughter 5446 Calumet Ave. Chicago, IL

Sec#: 20a Lot#. 503A Single Grave# 819

More About MATILDA DAWSON:

1870 Census: January 1870, Cairo, Alexander Co., IL. S. Cairo Pct.

1900 Census: January 06, 1900, Springfield, Sangamon Co., Illinois., 1st Pct. Gov. Mansion

1910 Census: 1910, Springfield, Sangamon Co., IL, Capitol Twp. 308 Allen St.

Burial/Cemetery: March 31, 1930, Greenwood Cemetery, Rockford, IL

Cause of Death: Carcinoma of the Stomach

Race: Mulatto

Soundex: P362

Notes for HENRY PATRICK:

Extract from 1865 State Census Illinois. Cairo, Alexander Co., Colored Pct. , Henry Patrick age 10-

20[Allfam3.FTW]

Notes for HENRY G. WILSON:

Occupation: Butler, 1900 Census.

Obituary:

The Illinois State Journal Springfield October 1909

Wilson - Died at 1:10 am Monday October 4, 1090 at his residence 1947 South Eleventh street. Henry G. Wilson at the age of 54 years. The Funeral will be held at 2:30 pm tomorrow at the residence. Rev. A. W. Williams officiating. Mr. Wilson is survived by his wife Mrs. Matilda Wilson and one uncle Thornton Gibbs, Elk hart Ill.

Friends wishing to view the remains may do so between the hours of 10 am and 2 pm tomorrow.

Interment will be in Oak Ridge Cemetery.

More About HENRY G. WILSON:

1900 Census: January 06, 1900, Springfield, Sangamon Co., Illinois., 1st Pct. Gov. Mansion

Obituary: October 1909, The Illinois State Journal Springfield October 1909 (Source: The Illinois State Journal

Springfield October 1909.)

Race: Black

Soundex: W425

Marriage Notes for MATILDA DAWSON and HENRY WILSON:

State of Illinois Sangamon county Volume #005 Page # 0213 - Record # 35

Sangamon County, Illinois Marriage Applications March 26,1879 thru Dec.31,1881

License #8068, Date of license: 12/5/1878

Full name of Groom: Henry G. Wilson / Place of residence: Woodside Township/ Occupation: Hotel Waiter

/Age next birthday: 27 / Race or color: African / Place of birth: Missouri / Father's Name: / Mother's maiden

name: Sarah J. Gibs / No. of Groom's marriage: First

Full name of Bride: Matilda Patrick / Maiden name if widow: Matilda Robert / Place of residence: Springfield,

IL/Age next birthday: 37 / Race or color: African / Place of birth: Missouri / Father's Name: / Mother's maiden

name: Dossen Robert / No. of bride's marriage: Second

Where and when married: at Oscar Boarder Residence 12/5/1878 George Brents, Minister of the Gospel /

Witnesses: John Wilson and James Harbiliard.

Children of MATILDA DAWSON and HENRY PATRICK are:

i. LOUISA3 PATRICK, b. 1861, Missouri; d. 1929-11-01 Chicago, Illinois; m. HENRY MCCULLOUGH, April 21, 1880,

Sangamon County, IL; b. 1857; d. 1922-05-08, Sangamon County, Illinois.

Notes for LOUISA PATRICK:

[Allfam3.FTW]

Illinois Death Records: MC CULLOUGH LOUISA F/W UNK 6030886 COOK

CHICAGO 29-11-02

More About LOUISA PATRICK:

1870 Census: January 1870, Cairo, Alexander Co., Illinois. S. Cairo Pct.

Soundex: P362

Notes for HENRY MCCULLOUGH:

[Allfam3.FTW]

IL State Death Records: MC CULLOUGH HENRY M/N UNK 2840380 1922-05-08 SANGAMON

SPRINGFIELD 22-05-10

Marriage Notes for LOUISA PATRICK and HENRY MCCULLOUGH:

[Allfam3.FTW]

Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763 - 1900

GROOM BRIDE CNTY DATE VOL/PAGE LIC

MCCULLOUGH, HENRY PATRICK, LOUISA SANGAMON 04/21/1880 005/0283

Sangamon County, Illinois Marriage Applications March 26,1879 thru Dec.31,1881

8768 Mc McCullough, Henry Apr 21 1880Patrick, Louisa

23 Springfield, IL 18 Springfield, IL

Witness-Henry G. Wilson

ii. JULIA PATRICK, b. 1862, Missouri; d. Bef. 1910, Unknown.

3. iii. FANNIE PATRICK, b. August 31, 1862, Fayette, Missouri; d. March 11, 1938, Springfield, Illinois..

Generation No. 3

3. FANNIE3 PATRICK (MATILDA2 DAWSON, ROBERT1) was born August 31, 1862 in Fayette, Missouri, and died March 11, 1938 in Springfield, Illinois.. She married JULIUS ROBERT WATTS November 23, 1881 in Springfield, Illinois.

*Please feel free to add anecdotes or information on family members from or living in Missouri when you comment.

Timeline of Missouri's African American History

1821 Missouri became the 24th state of the United States of America (August 10).
1821 The American Colonization Society founded the colony of Liberia in western Africa for freed slaves.
1823 The Missouri General Assembly authorized each county to establish slave patrols to guard against slave plots and insurrections.
1824 The Missouri General Assembly retained territorial legislation enabling persons held in slavery illegally to sue for their freedom (December 30).
1824 In the slave freedom suit Winny v. Whitesides, the Missouri Supreme Court established the judicial precedent of "once free, always free" to determine the outcome of such freedom suits.
1827 In Merry v. Tiffin & Menard, the Missouri Supreme Court held that a slave was emancipated by residence in any territory where slavery was prohibited by the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.
1829 In Trammel v. Adams, the Missouri Supreme Court determined that residence in Illinois entitled a slave to freedom even if s/he came to Missouri afterward.
1834 William Wells Brown escaped slavery in St. Louis, later becoming an abolitionist and America's first African American novelist.
1835 All free blacks and mulattoes, aged seven to twenty-one, were legislatively ordered by Missouri's General Assembly to be bound as apprentices or servants.
1835 To remain in Missouri, all free blacks were required to obtain a "free-license" from the county court.
1834 In the Missouri Supreme Court, the case of Margurite v. Pierre Chouteau, Sr., officially ended Indian slavery in Missouri.
1836 The descendants of Marie Jean Scypion, an Afro-Indian slave in colonial Missouri, were awarded freedom by the Jefferson County Circuit Court based on their Native American ancestry following legal battles that lasted over three decades. The Missouri Supreme Court and the United States Supreme Court upheld the decision in 1838.
1836 In Rachel v. Walker, the Missouri Supreme Court held that if an officer of the United States Army takes a slave to a territory where slavery is prohibited, he forfeits his property.
1836 After he fatally stabbed a deputy sheriff, Francis McIntosh was brutally lynched in St. Louis, earning the city a reputation for lawlessness and barbaric behavior (April 28).
1837 Elijah Lovejoy, abolitionist clergyman and St. Louis newspaper editor, died defending his press from a mob siege in Alton, Illinois (November 7).
1837 The Missouri Supreme Court, in Jennings v. Kavanaugh, ruled that an owner was not liable for the criminal acts of his slave property.

James Milton Turner
courtesy Lincoln University, Page Library

1839 Tom Bass was born a slave in Boone County; later became nationally-known equestrian (January 5).
1839 James Milton Turner was born a slave in St. Louis County (August 22). He became Missouri's most prominent African American leader after the Civil War, promoting black education. He also served as U.S. Minister to Liberia.
1846 The constitutionality of the "free-license" law was upheld.
1846 Dred and Harriet Scott initiated a suit for freedom in the St. Louis Circuit Court. Under Missouri statutes, the suit was allowed based on previous residence in a free territory (Wisconsin) before return to the slave state of Missouri (April 6).

DS
1847 The Missouri legislature passed a law prohibiting the education of blacks, free or slave.
1847 Hiram Young purchased his freedom and settled in western Missouri. His Independence-based business, making yokes and wagons for westward expansion, was one of the largest in Jackson County by 1860.
1854 Augustus Tolton, born a slave in Ralls County, Missouri, became the first recognized African American Catholic priest in the United States (April 1).
1854 President Franklin Pierce signed the Kansas-Nebraska Act, allowing "popular sovereignty" to determine whether a territory would be a slave or free state. This act set the stage for the violent Kansas-Missouri border wars where Missouri "Border Ruffians" and Kansas "Jayhawkers" transformed a frontier quarrel over slavery's borders into a national issue (May 30)
1855 Elizabeth Keckley purchased her freedom in St. Louis; she was later employed by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln (November 15).
1855 Celia, a Callaway County slave, was executed for the murder of her sexually abusive owner, Robert Newsom (December 23).
1857 U.S. Chief Justice Roger B. Taney handed down the Dred Scott decision (March 6). The case, which originated in St. Louis, intensified the sectional controversy regarding the expansion of slavery. Taney concluded that Scott lacked standing in court because he lacked U.S. citizenship. In Taney's opinion, slaves as well as free blacks, would never be able to become U.S. citizens; hence, Scott had no standing to sue in a court of law. Taney also took the opportunity to argue that each state had the right to determine the status of slaves, and that Congress had exceeded its powers in forbidding slavery in certain areas of the Louisiana Purchase; therefore, the Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional.
1858 The Colored Aristocracy of St. Louis, published by Cyprian Clamorgan, profiled St. Louis free African American society.

1 Comments:

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December 21, 2005 at 10:30 AM  

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